THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Southern Bluefin Tuna, Kingies, Marlin and other game fish.
Paulanderson
Rank: Australian Salmon
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THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby Paulanderson » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:11 pm

I had a lot of sympathy for some members who have lost some large SBT and other fish lately. When my fishing mate and I started game fishing along the NSW South coast we lost fish for every reason imaginable - some quite ridiculous when I look back at it. For example sitting behind a trawler that had just lifted its net watching 60 kg plus Yellowfin go crazy over trash fish while we sat there with whole Striped Tuna out for bait - ending up spending 4 hours on a very large whaler shark which we finally lost under the boat. We lost fish due to striking early, striking late, bad drag settings, gear failure, poor hook positions and the wrong hooks, stuffed up gaffing and all sorts of other reasons. We even lost a large Yellowfin due to using an old tail rope that broke when the fish went crazy after being gaffed and tied up. Over several seasons though we ironed out all these issues and, while we still lost the occasional fish, it was more bad luck rather than our mistakes.

What I am saying is that we should learn from our mistakes and if a boat owner can have a regular crew then mistakes get fewer and fewer and success becomes the norm rather than failure. Of course sometimes due to circumstances we may end up with an inexperienced crew member from time to time and that is when clear instructions are very necessary so that avoidable mistakes are not made. Do you really want someone that has never used a flying gaff before trying to gaff that 100 kg SBT? While we all have to start sometime the value of an experienced crew cannot be over-emphasized!

Just a few thoughts!



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Wolly Bugger
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby Wolly Bugger » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:28 pm

Paulanderson wrote:I had a lot of sympathy for some members who have lost some large SBT and other fish lately. When my fishing mate and I started game fishing along the NSW South coast we lost fish for every reason imaginable - some quite ridiculous when I look back at it. For example sitting behind a trawler that had just lifted its net watching 60 kg plus Yellowfin go crazy over trash fish while we sat there with whole Striped Tuna out for bait - ending up spending 4 hours on a very large whaler shark which we finally lost under the boat. We lost fish due to striking early, striking late, bad drag settings, gear failure, poor hook positions and the wrong hooks, stuffed up gaffing and all sorts of other reasons. We even lost a large Yellowfin due to using an old tail rope that broke when the fish went crazy after being gaffed and tied up. Over several seasons though we ironed out all these issues and, while we still lost the occasional fish, it was more bad luck rather than our mistakes.

What I am saying is that we should learn from our mistakes and if a boat owner can have a regular crew then mistakes get fewer and fewer and success becomes the norm rather than failure. Of course sometimes due to circumstances we may end up with an inexperienced crew member from time to time and that is when clear instructions are very necessary so that avoidable mistakes are not made. Do you really want someone that has never used a flying gaff before trying to gaff that 100 kg SBT? While we all have to start sometime the value of an experienced crew cannot be over-emphasized!

Just a few thoughts!


In an ideal situation the crew needs to have a few training runs, on how to set up a spread and whose jobs is what. How to drive the boat and position it to fight the fish.

Me sadly I haven't had any training runs with a decent deckhand, I do have training runs by myself and I am thinking about getting an auto pilot for the boat. (Most of my training is armchair training :rofl: :notworthy: ) at the moment.

I bought one of those dredge teasers, and figured out how to keep it down with out using a lot of weight. Also got a witchdoctor that i haven't used yet.

barra mick
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby barra mick » Wed Jun 14, 2017 11:59 pm

Wolly Bugger wrote:
Paulanderson wrote:I had a lot of sympathy for some members who have lost some large SBT and other fish lately. When my fishing mate and I started game fishing along the NSW South coast we lost fish for every reason imaginable - some quite ridiculous when I look back at it. For example sitting behind a trawler that had just lifted its net watching 60 kg plus Yellowfin go crazy over trash fish while we sat there with whole Striped Tuna out for bait - ending up spending 4 hours on a very large whaler shark which we finally lost under the boat. We lost fish due to striking early, striking late, bad drag settings, gear failure, poor hook positions and the wrong hooks, stuffed up gaffing and all sorts of other reasons. We even lost a large Yellowfin due to using an old tail rope that broke when the fish went crazy after being gaffed and tied up. Over several seasons though we ironed out all these issues and, while we still lost the occasional fish, it was more bad luck rather than our mistakes.

What I am saying is that we should learn from our mistakes and if a boat owner can have a regular crew then mistakes get fewer and fewer and success becomes the norm rather than failure. Of course sometimes due to circumstances we may end up with an inexperienced crew member from time to time and that is when clear instructions are very necessary so that avoidable mistakes are not made. Do you really want someone that has never used a flying gaff before trying to gaff that 100 kg SBT? While we all have to start sometime the value of an experienced crew cannot be over-emphasized!

Just a few thoughts!


In an ideal situation the crew needs to have a few training runs, on how to set up a spread and whose jobs is what. How to drive the boat and position it to fight the fish.

Me sadly I haven't had any training runs with a decent deckhand, I do have training runs by myself and I am thinking about getting an auto pilot for the boat. (Most of my training is armchair training :rofl: :notworthy: ) at the moment.

I bought one of those dredge teasers, and figured out how to keep it down with out using a lot of weight. Also got a witchdoctor that i haven't used yet.


Ive got a witch doctor. ...its the best thing for ttolling.

smile0784
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby smile0784 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:33 am

See this attack on a dredger.
https://youtu.be/DND717lnFLQ

Wolly Bugger
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby Wolly Bugger » Thu Jun 15, 2017 4:17 am

smile0784 wrote:See this attack on a dredger.
https://youtu.be/DND717lnFLQ


I saw that he had dead baits on the teaser. Interesting that we are told that fish get eaten from the head end, yet the Mako was taking the tail end.

Nude up
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby Nude up » Thu Jun 15, 2017 5:00 am

Wolly Bugger wrote:
smile0784 wrote:See this attack on a dredger.
https://youtu.be/DND717lnFLQ


I saw that he had dead baits on the teaser. Interesting that we are told that fish get eaten from the head end, yet the Mako was taking the tail end.

not all get eaten from the head kingfish for example can recognise the bait fish slimies and other soft baits they will take from the rear but if a fish has gill rakers or spines they take from the head first



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Nude up
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby Nude up » Thu Jun 15, 2017 5:19 am

I couldnt agree more regarding a good crew.everybody needs to know who is doing what from the hook up clearing the rods teasers etc then getting the harness on the angler. who is going to do what when the fish is boatside tag it or gaff it etc.
We had a bad year last year with silly gear failures due to our lack of prep we had a disscussion this year prior to the trip and we paid a lot more attention to our gear each day setting drags inspecting the gear last year a roller fell out of the guide and we didnt notice till we were out at sea

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cheaterparts
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby cheaterparts » Thu Jun 15, 2017 8:18 am

Paulanderson wrote:I had a lot of sympathy for some members who have lost some large SBT and other fish lately.

What I am saying is that we should learn from our mistakes


I found this a good read - you should try chasing pelagics without a motor and a crew of one - learning the trade is made harder by those 30 + km paddle days on open water trying to find them and talking them into taking the bait
but a few of my mate are now starting to pull SBT mostly scoolies up to 25 kg sooner or later one of us will hook something bigger
My kayak PBs
Gummy shark 128 Cm - Elephant fish 85 Cm - Snapper 91 Cm - KG Whiting 49 Cm - Flathead 55 Cm - Garfish 47 Cm - Silver Trevally 40 Cm - Long Fin Pike 41.5 Cm - snook 64 Cm - Couta 71 Cm - Sth Calamari 40 Cm hood


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rb85
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby rb85 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 9:42 am

Experienced crews are valuable no doubt teaching good friends to become good crew members is more enjoyable for me. Can't stand know it alls who don't shut up that actually know f all.

CarlG
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Re: THE VALUE OF A GOOD CREW

Postby CarlG » Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:42 pm

Interesting read. I can certainly relate to a lot of it, my mate recently upgraded his boat from a 4.5 to a 6.4mtr vessel. The learning curve from fishing for snaps, gummies and whiting in westernport, to heading out of the entrance, drifting for mako's, and down to Portland for tuna, is utterly enormous.
A mountain of study, both online, and asking people in the know, buying and setting up much heavier gear than we'd normally use. Different techniques and ideas, it's fairly daunting, and this is where using the same guys is especially important. I know my jobs, my mate knows his, and our new crew member is learning his, ( we've gone from 2 to a 3 man crew, especially for offshore).
We find the best way, is to discuss all the events liable to happen, and get all the order sorted out before hand.
Most important, and rule number one, skippers word is final. Offer advice, (if you've done your homework), but don't bloody whine if your skipper has another plan.
Got couta..?



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