So You think you can cast?

All topics related to fishing and angling in Victoria that don't fit into one of the other forum categories.
Wolly Bugger
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So You think you can cast?

Postby Wolly Bugger » Thu Jun 11, 2015 5:47 pm

So you think you can cast a surf rod?

A Soccer field can be between 80-120 metres
A Rugby fields should be 100 metres. Goal to Goal.
An AFL field between 135-180 metres. Goal to Goal.

As most AFL fields double as cricket grounds, the cricket pitch is close to the half way mark. On some suburban ovals this is around 40-50 metres.

The reason I am giving the distances of the footy fields, that are most likely to be found in your suburb. So it saves trying to measure how far you think you can cast.

Take my challenge, and find a field where you can have your ego deflated. When I first started casting I thought I was doing very well. Very well that is until I measured it. It was a measly 35-40 metres.

I will attempt step by step to break this down.

( I will eventually unlock this topic, but be warned, if you don't stick to the topic, I will give you a holiday.)



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Wolly Bugger
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Re: So You think you can cast?

Postby Wolly Bugger » Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:45 pm

What are the essentials of being able to make distance casting?

Firstly lets look at distances that are able to be obtained.

The world record for casting a fly line is 243 feet. This equates to 74 metres for lure made of fur and feathers.
The Australian Surf Casting Federation records distances of 224 metres. This distance is obtained just using a sinker without a baited hook.

Without the essentials, it doesn't matter if you have the best, most expensive rod and reel in the world, you will need to get the essentials together first. Miss one essential and the ability to cast a significant distance suffers.

So what do you think are the essentials and what is the most important essential?

1) The rod?
2) The reel?
3) The line?
4) The Casting weight?
5) Wind resistance?

If you answered Yes to any of the above, you are wrong. The most important essential element is the person holding the rod and that is you.

A lot depends on your ability to learn and your willingness to practise as well as some physical attributes. As with any sport, the more you practise, the better you can become at it.

Wolly Bugger
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Re: So You think you can cast?

Postby Wolly Bugger » Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:12 pm

Next essential is the fishing line.

These are the rules at the Australian Surfcasting Federation. ASF
http://www.australiansurfcastingfederat ... /comp.html
6. LINES & LEADER - They must be of general circular section and parallel throughout and be of basic monofilament construction.

6a. RUNNING LINE - To be minimum of 0.35mm for 175gr & 200gr, 0.31mm for 150gr and 0.28mm for 125gr and 0.25mm for 50gr, 75gr & 100gr.

6b. CASTING LEADER - To be high visibility/fluorescent and minimum 0.75mm for 150gr, 175gr and 200gr and minimum 0.65mm for 50gr, 75gr, 100gr & 125gr, with at least 8 complete turns on the reel when ready to cast.

7. MANDATORY CASTING WEIGHTS (100gr, 125gr, 150gr, 175gr) - To be fixed to leader via an appropriate link. No excessive polishing of weights will be allowed. A cast will be declared void unless these conditions are adhered to.



Tritanium or Ultima Power Steel or Ultima Distance
Hi Seas mono
platypus super 100

This is just too name a few types of mono. The other thing is that is must be supple, not stiff. Mono as it ages can loose it suppleness.

The greater the diameter of the fishing line, the more wind resistance there is.
Fortunately unless you are after a record, you can use what ever you like and use braid, which is has a much thinner diameter than mono for a given breaking strain.

Wolly Bugger
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Re: So You think you can cast?

Postby Wolly Bugger » Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:25 pm

The reel.

There are three types of reels, the egg beater or spinning reel. The bait caster and the Alvey or side cast reel.

The first and most commonly used fishing reel is the spinning or eggbeater.

About 20 years ago Shimano came out with what they called the longcast spool. This spool was longer than the spools on regular fishing reels at the time. This resulted in a shallower cup.


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